The Biggest Civil Rights Protest You Probably Never Heard of

A couple of weeks ago, on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, I wrote about Jeanne Theoharis’s important book A More Beautiful and Terrible History: The Uses and Misuses of Civil Rights History, in which she reminds historians—and the broader public—not to neglect the movement in the North. In one particularly powerful example, Theoharis notes the … Continue reading The Biggest Civil Rights Protest You Probably Never Heard of

The Civil War, Then and Now: Continuities from The Thin Light of Freedom

Over the weekend, I finished reading Ed Ayers’s most recent book The Thin Light of Freedom: The Civil War and Emancipation in the Heart of America. The book is the long-awaited follow-up to Ayers’ Bancroft Prize winner, In the Presence of Mine Enemies: The Civil War in the Heart of America, 1859-1863. Picking up where … Continue reading The Civil War, Then and Now: Continuities from The Thin Light of Freedom

Reagan’s Farewell Address, Revisited (Part II)

Today is the thirtieth anniversary of Ronald Reagan’s Farewell Address. As I discussed in my previous post, the speech is rife with historical missteps. But revisiting Reagan’s address thirty years on also allows us to take note of another remarkable change that has occurred over the past three decades. Let’s start here: Remember the polarized … Continue reading Reagan’s Farewell Address, Revisited (Part II)